It Happened to Jane

You are invited to rate and comment on the 39 films of Doris Day.

How do you rate "It Happened to Jane"?

Poor
0
No votes
Average
5
8%
Good
34
52%
Excellent
27
41%
 
Total votes: 66

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Johnny
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Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: It Happened to Jane

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It Happened To Jane Movie Trivia:

Jack Lemmon wrote that he thought this was a good , funny movie that didn't do well because of its' "terrible title". He thought he and Doris Day had very good chemistry together, and he regretted that they never made another film together.


This was one of Doris Day's rare total failures at the box office, so much so that Columbia tried re-releasing it under the title Twinkle and Shine. Their second release was no more successful than the first. Later that same year Day enjoyed one of the biggest hits of her career, Pillow Talk (her first film co-starring Rock Hudson) and by the end of 1959, Day placed 4th on the Top Ten Box Office Stars.


The film's director Richard Quine , had a reputation for making perfectly charming films that somehow never caught on with movie-- goers. His other credits include Audrey Hepburn and William Holden in Paris When It Sizzles and the Jack Lemmon/Janet Leigh version of My Sister Eileen.

In the movie Teddy Rooney plays Doris Day's son Billy. Billy would later become the name of one of Doris' sons in her TV show played by Philip Brown.
Johnny

User avatar
Johnny
Honorary Member
Posts: 3105
Joined: 10 Oct 2007, 16:02
Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: It Happened to Jane

Unread post by Johnny »

Original New York Times Review for
It Happened To Jane

by Howard Thompson

August 6- 1959

"A legal tug-of-war between a pretty lobster selling widow and a powerful railroad magnate is the subject of a bouncy good-natured little comedy called, "It Happened To Jane ", which headed a new Columbia double-bill program at neighbourhood theaters yesterday. If th kie going is a little strident and bumpy at times , the brash merriment provides more than a reasonable share of chuckles.With a good cast headed by Doris Day, Jack Lemmon, and Ernie Kovacs , the picture also provides one of the prettiest comedy backgrounds we've seen in a long time --a tint New England community, citizens included, Using a scenario by Norman Markov , the director- producer, Richard Quine- , has extracted some lively amusement from this tale of a scrappy New England woman., Miss Day and her private war with "the meanest man in the world"."deliciously played by Mr. Kovacs , as the nation watches. If their fight over a decrepit little train seems a bit sputtery and strident towards the end , no harm is done. For one thing, it moves. Mr. Quine must have told his personable cast to get in there and run. The breezy Miss Day especially at the beginning, gallops away like Paul Revere's horse, trailed by Mr. Lemmon, as a smitten home- town lawyer, Steve Forrest as a city reporter , and a winning gallery of small-town folks., Including such people as Mary Wickes and John Cecil Holm. This strictly one - gag frolic is at most disarming as a peppery close-up of small-town life -- one sequence of a town meeting is a pip. And Mr. Katkov has flavoured the proceedings nicely with some convincing dialogue and an awareness of the community's Colonial trimmings. It would be hard indeed to take offence at such a brashly friendly little picture.Nost of it is fun. And one touch, Mr. Kovacs majestically retires for the night , is hilarious. Make no mistake, everyone is certainly in there pitching -- when not running.
Johnny

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